PUBLICACIONES

TIERRA DEL FUEGO: TREES WITHOUT SHADOWS
INTERVIEW JOHN K. GRANDE 2005
TO BE IN MATTER, TO BE IN SCULPTURE
STEEL HORSES
STONE AND IMAGE
INTRODUCTION - by Tim Scott
STEEL WILLOWS
ABOUT FRANCISCO GAZITUA
MATTER
INTERVIEW TO ANTHONY CARO
TEXTS LILY KASNER
BLACK AND WHITE
BRIDGES
ART AND SCIENCE
THE COMMITMENT WITH SCULPTURE IN THE PUBLIC SPACE

MATTER
Francisco Gazitua

As an extension of my works, I transcribe a series of reflections – some clear, others obscured, which reveal the themes of my sculpture. Far from wanting to delineate or over-define the discipline of sculpture, I present these writings as a phenomenological medium, based upon my experience in the company of this subject, matter: a field that I have not yet achieved a full understanding but into which, through my practice, I have been forging my own entryway.

I come from a background that will be common to any sculptor formed between the sixties and seventies.

The literary doorway into the realm of sculpture was closed to me due to Rodin and the best works of Constantin Brancusi from the turn of the century, when these artists created sculpture independent of artistic convention. Following this new lineage, and around the same period (between 1916 and 1918) Picasso, via his paintings, opened the doorway to collage. This constructive method of creating sculpture – neither carved nor modeled – was the act of joining various objects together in order to construct a new, plastic totality. This was the beginning point for me, and a challenge myself and all other sculptors of the century had to confront.

Construction was established as the new "cannon." It was the great alternative to Rodin,

The influence of collage in our epoch has been tremendous; its stature in sculptural composition was founded by Brancusi in France, Epstein and Gil in England, and continued and popularized by the contemporaries of Henry Moore. In Chile, constructive art was developed by the generation of Lily Garafulic, Samual Roman and Marta Colvin, having finally been exposed to the proponents of collage such as Picasso, Julio Gonzalez, David Smith and Anthony Caro. This undercurrent, known by the sculptural nomenclature as the constructed, prepared the sculptural scene in the 1960's, ultimately establishing the great sculptural circuits of the previous three decades.

There have been two overwhelming revolutions in sculpture over the past century: la talla directa, or direct intervention into matter and construccion, or constructive method: the latter being one of the great contributions of Picasso, who augmented our sculptural dictionary from two words - bronze and marble - to a million: all presented forms of matter in the universe. Any media can be combined in a collage. This change, which arose as an evolution in the field of technique, has had profound implications on the base of sculptural language.

The carving of Brancusi and Epstein changed the practical life of sculptors – no longer are we white-aproned modelers or simple craftsmen. The constructive method definitively changed our workshops and the way we lived. We added to our collections of carving and modeling tools all of the devices created for contemporary and traditional techniques. Our studios were no longer ivory towers, nor cloistered sanctuaries. In effect, this change slowly began hammering away at our mental delineations until we began questioning the whole system of ideas under which we worked everyday.

The majority of these structured ideas were formed in the 16th and 17th centuries through the creation of the first academies, those "bounded courts" upon which the specialized critique of a fixed, inalterable sculpture is based, and is still spoken of to this day. In my opinion, this discourse is valueless with regards to the game modern sculptors are playing.

Inundated by this change, elicited by the great elaboration of the sculptural dictionary, sculptors have lost themselves in an unfamiliar and deep ocean. From the sheltered port of the human figure, carved in marble or bronze, we set sail towards unknown waters: all possible matter with no conventional manner of forming it.

Ver Mas