PUBLICACIONES

TIERRA DEL FUEGO: TREES WITHOUT SHADOWS
INTERVIEW JOHN K. GRANDE 2005
TO BE IN MATTER, TO BE IN SCULPTURE
STEEL HORSES
STONE AND IMAGE
INTRODUCTION - by Tim Scott
STEEL WILLOWS
ABOUT FRANCISCO GAZITUA
MATTER
INTERVIEW TO ANTHONY CARO
TEXTS LILY KASNER
BLACK AND WHITE
BRIDGES
ART AND SCIENCE
THE COMMITMENT WITH SCULPTURE IN THE PUBLIC SPACE

ABOUT FRANCISCO GAZITUA
From the book Metal Design International 2008
EPHAISTOS Publishing House Germany.

Those who immerse themselves in the world of Francisco Gazitua's sculptures feel like they are entering a different universe. For viewers and explorers alike, the Chilean sculptor has created a lifework that takes your breath away! The monumental steel sculptures are, for now, the final stage of his lifelong search for a "Language of Sculptures"; a search that can be described as research on the path to the identity and expressiveness of materials. With his work in steel, stone, and wood, Francisco Gazitua intends to let the material speak in its primal form according to the way he works with it: "My wood comes from the forests around my granite quarry, where I live and work and recover rocks never before touched by human hands. Every piece of steel for my sculptures was modeled in the hot, red fire of the forge. I interpret the material."

Francisco Gazitua, who was born on September 29, 1944, defines his creative process as "functional design". With this term, he describes the expressiveness and style of his sculptures. When he is working with wood or metal, Gazitua follows the tradition of classic sculpture. However, he considers metal sculpture to be a very recent form of fine art which he also helped take to a new level through his work at the start of the 21st century.
The master finds themes and motives in his home country. Without, as he says, "being proverbially figurative, my sculptures tell stories about familiar things," about his home country of Chile, the history of the American continent, the beauty of Tierra del Fuego and Patagonia, the Andes, the Cordilleras. With professional enthusiasm and a childlike enjoyment of form and function, design and pictorial language, he is able to artistically exaggerate trees, horses, and ships – and, in the past, also the human form – and to develop them for his sculptures. His selections also include objects that are not readily apparent as themes for a sculpture, such as approximately 40 preserved water wheels from an irrigation system in the Larmahue region, a Chilean cultural heritage site from the pre-industrial 17th century.

Francisco Gazitua is more than just a performer; he also considers himself a facilitator. For 35 years, his life was filled by teaching. First, in 1968, he taught sculpture at the Catholic University of Chile in Santiago. He himself had studied philosophy there, in addition to his course of studies in sculpture at the faculty of arts at the University of Chile, where he also taught for four years ending in 1973. And then he took the leap to Europe. From 1978 to 1985, he was a professor at Saint Martin's School of Arts in England; from 1983 to 1985, he also taught at the City Lit School of Arts in London, and in 1984, Gazitua was a guest professor at the Royal College of Art in London. During this time, he also worked in the studios of the British metal sculptors Tim Scott, Phillip King, and Sir Anthony Caro. Gazitua founded three sculpture schools; the first, in 1980, was in Kornaria, Istria, in Croatia. There he taught stone sculpture in marble until 2003. He founded the faculty of sculpture at the Finis Terrae University in Santiago de Chile, and a workshop school also located in the Chilean capital.

 

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